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INSPIRATION - CONSULTING

PASSAGE CONTROL - SAFETY

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INSPIRATION - KONSULTATION

PASSAGEKONTROLL - SÄKERHET

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Rising barriers

Bollards

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vehicle products

Road blockers

THINK BEFORE...

Most people buying products for passage control do it very seldom and are not very engaged in the products. That means that it is complicated to evaluate the different products and for ordinary people most products are the same.

To buy "the cheapest" is in many cases the most expensive as the product did not fulfil what it was meant to do.

Many websites are beautiful but are missing objective information. If you do not understand, ask for technical sheets. If you can not get one, go for something else.

 

There should also be technical sheets, manuals and electrical connection diagrams in the local language for each product. If this does not exist, there is quite often lack of knowledge, and then it is difficult to use local service people in the future when needed.

Down below is some information about how different similar products can be.

In the folders  "Pedestrianrson-related" and "Vehicle-ralated" we will go a little mor into details.

 

 

 

A rising barrier is from €1,500 to €32,500.

Opening speed is from 0.5 to 30 s.

Free passage up to 14 m.

Surface treatment from thin painted steel to galvanised or stainless steel.

An automatic bollard is from €2,000 up to €25,000 even if they still look almost the same above the ground.

The difference is that the cheap one breaks after a hit by a small car at 30 km/h and the expensive one is still working after an impact by a 7.5 t heavy truck in 80 km/h.

Road blockers exist in different shapes, widths and heights.

All of them are disigned to stop heavy vehicles in different speeds. 

Prices varies from €2,000 up to €50,000 according to which width and norm you choose.

 

Standards

There are different standards which help to evaluate the strength of a vehicle security barrie.

The new international norm IWA14-1 is divided into two classesr: security products and high security products.

Suppliers might say that theyhave tested their products according to a norm. Ask to get a copy to see the results before you make up your mind. If you are not quite sure, change supplier.

pedestrian products

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Turnstiles are cheap and simple solutions if you do not demand high security and have people at the reception.

There are both manual and electric alternatives.

Throughput 15-20 passages per minute.

 

Turnstiles

Swing gates

Swing gates, with moving panels in glass or steel profiles, can be used as single or double (above).

Since many people could pass when the gate is open, the use of swing gates fits better in staffed receptions.

Speedgates

Speedgate is a generic name for many products with almost the same function but with a different appearance, width, length and height of glass leaves.

Throughput 50-60 passages per minute.

 

Full-height turnstiles

Security doors

Full-height turnstiles are typically located in the perimeter protection. There are both manual and electric alternatives; they are available with a door for bikes as well.

Throughput 10-15 passages per minute.

Security doors for only one person per passage is the best solution when you demand high security.

They exist with bulletproof glass in many norms, control of left objects in the booth and metal detector.

Throughput 4-10 passages per minute

Quotable Quote…

“It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When
you pay too much, you lose a little money - that's all. When you pay
too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you
bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do. The
common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a
lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well
to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will
have enough to pay for something better.”

John Ruskin 1819 - 1900